Best sailing destinations in the North Seas

IntersailClub sailing destinations in the Indian Ocean? You’d be forgiven for mistaking Sardinia’s sugar sand and pellucid blue sea for a slice of Caribbean paradise. Set adrift from the Italian mainland, this island has it all; come for the luxury retail, stay for the swimming, snorkelling and beachside bliss. Visiting superyachts make a beeline for Hotel Cala di Volpe, a celebrity-approved hotel on the waterfront with private moorings available for the ultimate convenience. Enjoy a relaxed lunch on the terrace or an evening meal alfresco; the service is slick, the staff are friendly, and if you choose to spend a night on shore they’ll be more than happy to accommodate you. Down the eastern coast of the island is where you’ll find most of the island’s famed beaches. Consistently voted among the best in Europe, they’re all simple and straightforward to access from your yacht, and promise a relaxing day of swimming and soaking up the sunshine. Among the best is Cala Goloritze. Read more details at Intersail Club.

When visiting Italy, especially the south, you can enjoy a multitude of islands and coastal destinations that are within easy reach of each other. Sailing around here is fairly easy and sheltered. Besides the beautiful scenery that you will get to pass, the historic Italian towns and ports found around the country make it one of the most desirable European places to visit. As one of the countries with the longest Mediterranean coastlines and countless sailing spots and hidden gems, Italy is one of the top sailing destinations in the Mediterranean. This beautiful European country is home to some of the most popular Mediterranean destinations such as Sicily, the Amalfi Coast, Capri, and Sardinia.

As a year-round sailing destination, the Bahamas, or the Out Islands as they are frequently known, are renowned for great cruising grounds together with outstanding scenery. Benefitting from reliable trade winds between 5-20 knots, the climate is consistently warm, varying from 22 to 29 degrees Celsius. One of the most diverse geographic formations in the Caribbean, this coral-based archipelago consists of hundreds of unspoiled islands catering for yachting connoisseurs with world-class diving, pristine beaches, full-service marinas and fantastic fishing. The tidal range is up to 3.5 feet and, due to the shallow nature of the waters, a sailing yacht will provide best access to many locations. Miami is one of the most popular spots to make way to the Bahamas, and the southern winds when crossing the Gulfstream provide great sailing conditions. There is no bad time to visit the Bahamas, but peak season runs from mid-December to mid-April when island-hopping becomes popular.

The base charter fee in essence refers to the hire cost of the yacht itself, with all equipment in working order in addition to the cost of food and wages for the crew during the entirety of the charter. This is essentially all the base charter fee covers with additional expenses often applicable on top. The base charter fee will vary from one yacht to another and this may be down to any number of reasons from size and on board amenities to the charter season. For instance, the base rate of a charter yacht may increase in “high season” and reduce during the “low season”. “High season” and “low season” refers to the busiest and slowest periods for yacht charters though this may appear misleading, as these peak times refer to periods of weeks as opposed to full seasons. In addition, you may find that a yacht is also more expensive during special events such as the Monaco Grand Prix, Cannes Film Festival and America’s Cup. Unless you are keen to charter a yacht for a particular “high season” event, choose your dates carefully as although a “high season” rate will be more expensive than the “low season” the two can sometimes share much of the same weather conditions. Whatever the terms of your charter contract, you should understand the Advance Provisioning Allowance. This is an amount of about 20-25 per cent of the charter fee for a “plus all expenses” charter and about five per cent for an “all inclusive” charter. It is sent to the yacht before the charter to provision the yacht according to your preferences.

Sailing tip of the day: After a few honeymoon years, a boat’s fuel gauges, often inaccurate at best, tend to suffer from a high mortality rate. When push comes to shove, you can’t beat an old-fashioned dipstick. Given a sensible allowance for fuel slopping around in the tank at sea, a dipstick is the most reliable measure you’ll get. A threaded hole on top of the tank with a piece of rod welded across the plug so it can be hand-tightened onto a rubber washer makes the ideal access point for the stick. If you can’t arrange this and the filler pipe has a bend, a flexible steel tab like an engine-oil dipstick will usually get you there. You can calibrate the stick in harbor by running the tank almost dry, then topping it right up, marking the stick at every 5 gallons. Nobody did that for your boat’s fuel gauges. If they’re anything like the one on my car, you think there are hundreds of miles left until the needle suddenly hits the stop.

Island hopping around the Greek islands is at the top of many a traveller’s bucket list and the famously beautiful Ionian islands are a great place to begin. Start from Corfu or Lefkada and then meander through turquoise seas stopping off at each of the seven large islands and some of the smaller ones along the way (Paxoi and Antipaxoi make excellent sailing destinations). Expect all the usual cliched Greek images such as harbours filled with coloured fishing boats, white-washed villages, beautiful beaches, rugged mountains and traditional tavernas.

Cala Xuclá is one of the smallest and most secluded beaches on Ibiza. You won’t find flashy beach bars, washrooms or watersports in this tiny cove, which backs onto a dense and aromatic pine forest instead of a busy promenade. Fishermen still store their boats in little enclaves carved into the pink and red rocks that surround the beach, providing a rustic contrast to the fancy vessels seen moored off Ibiza’s more mainstream beaches. The underwater landscapes at Xuclá are just as rugged as its countryside, making it excellent for snorkelling. Whether you have been to heavenly destinations such as Greek Islands, the French Riviera, and Amalfi Coast before or not, these beautiful sailing spots in the Mediterranean will call you to come back over and over again. So, why not indulge in the opportunity to discover hidden natural gems, new local dishes, traditions, and people each time you visit the Mediterranean? Here are a few useful sailing yacht cruise tips to help you plan your unforgettable summer holiday in Europe’s fanciest location.

May is the time when the beautiful island of Ibiza starts to come to life once again. Usually, Ibiza should be now getting ready to inaugurate a busy summer season, with the opening of its famous clubs and discotheques and of a wide range of first class accommodations, ready to welcome most demanding guests travelling to the Island to enjoy Med’s ultimate destination for clubbers.